Sorting Necessary from Noise: How to Focus Your Board’s Time

September 30th, 2015

Director liability has expanded dramatically over the last decade. As pressures on bank boards intensify, their time has become constrained. How can board members protect themselves while building value for their institution? We can win if we play offense; below are 11 focal points for bank boards.

Focus on value creation. Few banks connect executive compensation and return for shareholders. Too many boards accept mediocre performance by executives, who should be enriched for growing tangible book value per share (TBVS), earnings per share (EPS) and franchise value, not the bank’s asset size.

Understand what drives value. An institution’s stock price is driven by multiples of TBVS and EPS, which reflect the market’s perception of the risk profile of the bank. By looking to build value for investors, boards can put in place the proper strategies to achieve their goals, and manage the risk, governance and regulatory environments.

Implement an enterprise risk management program (ERM). An ERM program does more than satisfy regulatory guidelines to establish an internal risk assessment program. The process also aligns the interests of different stakeholders, and improves the bank’s culture by instilling risk management responsibility, accountability and authority throughout the entire organization. It can boost the institution’s ability to raise new capital at higher multiples, fix liquidity and increase earnings. Finally, ERM enhances the strategic planning process by analyzing clearly delineated paths with the associated risk and rewards of each.

Stay educated. Board members have a limited time to stay up-to-date on the issues impacting the banking industry. Custom bank education, using the bank’s data, provides the most flexibility for directors. Topics should include emerging issues, economic developments, capital markets trends and regulatory pressures, as well as each topic’s direct impact to the directors’ institution.

Adopt governing principles. Prevent corporate drift by setting concrete principles which prevail above strategy or tactical solutions. Some examples are to achieve a specified CAMELS rating, eliminate regulatory orders, only consider a sale if market multiples reach a pre-determined level, or to set specific compounded annual return of TBVS over the next 3 years.

Validate corporate infrastructure. An ineffective corporate structure could mean that more regulatory agencies are examining your institution than necessary. Boards should discuss the value of their holding company, registering their stock, the appropriateness of the bank’s charter and target capital composition at least annually.

Commit to talent management. Many senior managers will retire over the next few years, but a proper talent management program encompasses more than succession planning. An annual management review helps the organization prepare for the future, but a robust program further enables banks to attract, retain and motivate employees.

Control the balance sheet. Between 2004 and 2007, the last rate rise, interest expense at depository institutions tripled. While models are necessary to understand the risk, the only way to turn this into a strategic advantage is to conduct price sensitivity analysis, customer retention analysis and customer loyalty studies.

Streamline corporate governance. The board’s primary responsibilities include setting the strategic direction for the bank, creating and updating policies, and establishing a feedback monitoring system for progress. Though conceptually simple, a typical director’s time is strained. Time spent on board matters can be streamlined by centralizing information under one system, using consent agendas, spreading policy approval dates, utilizing video technology, educating the board using bank specific data, and appropriately scheduling committee meetings.

Perform customer segmentation. Historically, banks have analyzed growth opportunities by assessing geographic boundaries. Today, institutions must now know and sell to their customers by identifying target customer profiles, developing products to profitably serve those customers, analyzing where those customers live, understanding how they communicate and building delivery channels specific to those customers.

Have a capital market plan. What is the institution worth on a trading and takeout basis? Who can we buy? Who would want to buy the bank and why? Should the institution consider stock repurchases or higher dividends? Regardless of size, every institution needs to ask itself these questions, and memorialize the discussion in an integrated capital markets plan.

sklinger

Stephen Brown Klinger is director of industry research at FinPro Inc. For more information on FinPro’s value building strategic planning services, director certification, new director orientation, and board retreat facilitation services, contact Stephen at 908-604-9336.