2016 Risk Practices Survey: Banks Beef Up on Cybersecurity

March 21st, 2016

cybersecurity-3-21-16.pngFor 77 percent of the bank executives and board members responding to Bank Director’s 2016 Risk Practices Survey, sponsored by FIS, cybersecurity remains their top concern, for the second year in a row. More than half indicate that preparing for cyberattacks is one of their organization’s biggest risk management challenges. While these concerns aren’t new, respondents this year indicate a shift in how their boards and executives are addressing the threat. Unfortunately, the fact remains that many banks still aren’t doing enough to protect themselves—and their customers.

Just 18 percent indicate their bank has experienced a data breach, but it’s important to note that these breaches were almost as likely to occur at a smaller, $500 million asset institution as at a larger institution above $10 billion. Cybersecurity can no longer be dismissed as merely a “big bank” concern.

In addition to identifying cybersecurity practices within the industry, the online survey asked 161 independent directors and chairmen, chief risk officers, chief executive officers and other senior executives of U.S. banks above $500 million in assets to weigh in on their bank’s risk governance, culture and infrastructure. The survey was conducted in January.

Compared to last year’s survey results, more respondents indicate their board reviews cybersecurity at every board meeting, at 34 percent compared to 18 percent last year. While this shift represents a significant increase in board-level attention to cyberthreats compared to last year, these institutions remain the exception rather than the rule.

Many banks have yet to fully utilize the Cybersecurity Assessment Tool, developed by the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council and made available to banks in 2015 “to help institutions identify their risks and determine their cybersecurity maturity.” Sixty-two percent of survey respondents indicate their bank has used the tool and completed an assessment. However, just 39 percent have validated the results, and 18 percent established board-approved triggers for update and reporting. All three prudential regulators—the Federal Reserve, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.— now use the tool in exams, regardless of the bank’s size. Several states have mandated its use as well.

Other key findings:

  • Seventy-eight percent indicate that their bank employs a full-time chief information security officer, up from 64 percent in last year’s survey.
  • Almost half report that the bank has a chief risk officer exclusively focused on risk, while 37 percent have a risk officer that is also focused on other areas of the bank.
  • Fifty-four percent of respondents who indicate that the bank has a CRO also say the board never meets with that individual.
  • Responses indicate a low level of board engagement with the chief risk officer: Just 21 percent indicate the CRO’s performance is reviewed, and compensation determined by, the board or a board committee.
  • Forty-eight percent of respondents govern risk within a separate, board-level risk committee, and 65 percent have at least one director who is considered to be a risk expert.
  • Forty-five percent indicate that risk performance is not incorporated into their bank’s compensation programs.
  • Just 55 percent indicate their bank has a risk appetite statement, which defines the acceptable amount of risk for an organization.

To view the full results to the survey, click here.

Cybersecurity: Five Best Practices To Protect Your Bank


emccormick

Emily McCormick is the Director of Research for Bank Director, an information resource for directors and officers of financial companies.You can follow her on Twitter at twitter.com/ehmccormick or get connected on LinkedIn.